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Author Topic: iYawn...  (Read 4480 times)
dapengmingwang
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« on: June 30, 2007, 11:42:36 PM »

Please don't make me support this piece of crap in the office...

And as I have mentioned before... as this guy is saying... Apple is a monopolistic piece of shit. And in my opinion, it's even worse than Microsoft.

First of all, Microsoft maybe anti-competition, but it isn't anti-choice. You are free to put whatever you want on your PC. Can u buy songs and put on your iPod from other than iTunes? Get a grip!!

And Bill Gates at least gives money to vaccinate all the kids in Indo-China and allow with Warren Buffet and the Gates Foundation, is doing the world a great deal of good. Steve Jobs fxxk up investors by getting some kind of share options that even the NYSE makes noise about. And he's just the kind of axxhole that Karl Marx would rave about.

Above which, M$ software, other than the CDs and the plastic cases they come on, are environmentally friendly, with the exception of the xBox, of course. But for Apple? Come on!! All that plastics in the iPod... and their electronic computers.

Can we say the H- word?

Quote
iYawn
Posted by Adrian Kingsley-Hughes @ 9:32 pm
June 26th, 2007

I was expecting that the early reviews of the iPhone would blow away any doubts that I had about needing a $500 ($600 for the 8GB model, $500 only buys you 4GB of storage).  While Apple's marketing had failed to convince me of how much my life would be better if I had an iPhone, I was expecting that Walt Mossberg/Katherine Boehret, David Pogue, Steven Levy and Edward C. Baig would show me the error of my ways.  I was wrong.  The iPhone has become the iYawn.

It's not a tool, it's a shiny baubleHaving read the Mossberg/Boehret and Pogue reviews, I'm realizing that Apple had given already us enough information about the iPhone already to see the strengths and weaknesses of the iPhone.  It didn't take a genius to guess that a virtual keyboard wouldn't be as effective as a real keyboard (Pogue: "Then there's the small matter of typing. Tapping the skinny little virtual keys on the screen is frustrating, especially at first.") and that web surfing over EDGE is going to suck no matter what kind of marketing spin Apple puts on it (Pogue: "The New York Times's home page takes 55 seconds to appear; Amazon.com, 100 seconds; Yahoo. two minutes. You almost ache for a dial-up modem.") Mossberg/Boehret: ("In addition, even when you have great AT&T coverage, the iPhone can't run on AT&T's fastest cellular data network. Instead, it uses a pokey network called EDGE, which is far slower than the fastest networks from Verizon or Sprint that power many other smart phones. And the initial iPhone model cannot be upgraded to use the faster networks.") The battery is not user replaceable so once that starts to feel a bit old the whole phone has to go back to the Apple mothership for repair.  There's no memory card slot, no chat app, no voice dialing, no GPS, no third-party apps, no Java or Flash support, no MMS support.

Sure, these plenty to like about the iPhone.  The sleek design, the OS, the full web browser, the large screen, the fact that it's an iPod, the Word/Excel/PDF read-only support.  Sure, all that sounds nice, but it's not $500 plus a minimum of $60 per month for two years nice.  Stand-alone, the iPhone might be worth $500, but as a two year, $2,000 package, it's way overpriced, especially when you can pick up a network subsidized phone that does more than the iPhone (and does it better) for under $300.  Choose the $100 per month plan and ownership costs for the first two years goes up to a staggering $2,900.

Technically, the iPhone is a marvelous achievement, but as with the PS3, it's not just what's crammed into the gadget that matters, it's how it's implemented.  The other day I mentioned how I thought that the iPhone was a convergence device, well, these initial review back this up.  Worse still, it's a device that's works hard to convince you that the things that it can do well are actually what's important to you in a cellphone.  Of course you don't want 3G, a GPS, MMS messaging and a removable battery, what you actually want is a touch-screen iPod hybrid that allows you to view YouTube videos and surf Google Maps and be stuck with AT&T as a provider.  What makes this situation worse is that the block on running third-party apps means that you're stuck with Apple's view of what a cellphone should be and have little hope of seeing choice.  For years Apple has accused Microsoft of being inflexible and dictating to customers what they need, well, with the iPhone Apple's doing exactly the same thing.

Overall, I'm disappointed.  When I look at the iPod of the MacBook, I see real cutting-edge innovation.  Sure, you can buy cheaper but it's hard to buy better.  The iPhone lacks this cutting-edge feel and is missing key cellphone features present if phones which cost less than half the price Apple expects you to pay for the iPhone.  It's not a tool, it's a shiny bauble.


Thoughts?
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 01:37:11 AM by Grievous » Logged

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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2007, 11:56:38 PM »

Other comments:

David Pogue, New York Times: Revolutionary and flawed

    As it turns out, much of the hype and some of the criticisms are justified. The iPhone is revolutionary; it's flawed. It's substance; it's style. It does things no phone has ever done before; it lacks features found even on the most basic phones.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 01:37:52 AM by Grievous » Logged

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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2007, 12:19:01 AM »

Convergence Devices Have a Frequent History of Failure
- By Al Ries
Published: June 18, 2007

In the gold rush of 1849, prospectors checked their finds with Aqua Regia, a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids. If a sample passed the acid test, it was the real thing.

When Apple introduces its iPhone this month, will it pass the acid test?

In my opinion, no.

Prediction No. 1: The iPhone will be a major disappointment.

The hype has been enormous. Apple says its iPhone is "literally five years ahead of any other mobile phone." A stock-market analyst says, "The iPhone has the potential to be even bigger than the iPod."

I think not. An iPod is a divergence device; an iPhone is a convergence device. There's a big difference between the two.

In the high-tech world, divergence devices have been spectacular successes. But convergence devices, for the most part, have been spectacular failures.

The first MP3 players (the Diamond Rio, for example) were flash-memory units capable of holding only 20 or 30 songs. The first iPod, on the other hand, had a hard drive and could hold thousands of songs. Now there were two types of MP3 players, a classic example of divergence at work.

Every high-tech device has followed a similar pattern. The first computer was a mainframe computer, followed by the minicomputer, the desktop computer, the laptop computer, the handheld computer, the server and other specialty computers. The computer didn't converge with another device. It diverged.

When the cellphone was first introduced, it was called a "car phone" because it was too big and heavy to lug around. You might have thought it would eventually converge with the automobile. It did not. Instead it diverged and today we have many types of cellphones.

Every Best Buy and Circuit City is filled with a host of other divergence devices that have been enormously successful: the digital camera, the plasma TV, the wireless e-mail device, the personal video recorder, the GPS navigation device.

What convergence device has been a big success? Not many, although there have been a lot of convergence failures.

    * The computer/phone. AT&T, Motorola and others introduced combination products. Few were ever purchased.
    * The computer/TV. Apple, Gateway, Toshiba, Philips and others tried to market combination products with little success.
    * Interactive TV. Microsoft spent $425 million to buy WebTV and then poured more than half a billion dollars into the venture. That didn't work, so it moved on to Ultimate TV, which didn't work either.
    * Cellevision. Everybody is talking about the third screen, watching TV on your cellphone, but relatively few people do. (The real action in TV is the booming market for divergence products such as big-screen plasma and LCD sets.)
    * Media-center PCs. Everybody was going to run everything in their homes from personal computers. It never happened.


Prediction No. 2: The media will blame the execution, not the concept.

Suppose the iPhone is a major disappointment. Will another convergence failure convince the high-tech industry of its folly? Highly unlikely.

Once a concept like convergence grips the imagination, it seldom dies.

A convergence failure is never seen as a "conceptual" failure; it's always seen as an "execution" failure. "The concept was sound; they just didn't do it right."

Hope springs eternal.
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2007, 11:33:51 AM »

Meizu M8: the iYawn clone for the masses

It's a clone courtesy of Meizu. The Meizu M8 looks just like the iPhone in every way, including the fairly unique set of icons for navigation. In fact, the M8 is more Apple than Apple as they've opted for a glossy white finish instead of a black one. There hasn't been any company confirmation at this point, but it's not unlike Meizu to "borrow iPod styling cues", you could say.

In terms of raw specs, the M8 is said to sport standard GSM, TD-SCDMA for 3G data, a 3.3-inch widescreen (720x480) display, Bluetooth, and an ARM11 CPU. What's more, they've upped the ante in the camera department, beating Apple's picture-taker by one whole megapixel. The 3MP cam on board is also capable of recording video at 30fps (at the device's full 720 x 480 resolution).

Still "just a rumor" at this point, but a incredibly juicy one that seems fairly well grounded in reality.
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2010, 10:11:35 PM »

More switch telcos on iPhone effect
User defections jump as handset becomes available across all telcos

By WINSTON CHAI
Published May 25, 2010 Business Times


(SINGAPORE) As further proof that the iPhone is the apple of Singaporeans' eyes, mobile subscriber defections have hit a record high after the coveted handset became available across all three local operators.

According to statistics from the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA), 12,500 users jumped ship last December.

This is the same month Singapore Telecommunications' year-long stranglehold on the iPhone was broken and the device was finally extended to rivals StarHub and M1.

The December tally for ported cellular subscriptions is the highest since the introduction of IDA's Mobile Number Portability (MNP) regime nearly two years ago.

This mandate allows mobile users to carry their phone numbers from one operator to another without having to rely on the call-forwarding system that was previously used for number retention.

Ported subscriptions remained high in the first three months of this year, averaging 10,900 monthly.

The figure is significantly higher than the average of 7,800 that was registered for the January to November period, before the iPhone was carried across the board.

Most market analysts had initially expected local churn rates to see a spike shortly after the introduction of MNP in June 2008.

This worry triggered a fierce marketing war between the three telcos. The skirmish eventually spilt blood on their balance sheets with a sharp increase in their subscriber acquisition and retention costs.

Their worries proved to be unfounded as the local churn rate remained low with only 0.1 per cent of local mobile population defecting each month despite the arrival of MNP.

However, the percentage has now doubled after the iPhone's arrival at M1 and StarHub shops.

'There's the 'bandwagon effect', where individuals flock to a product when they see others owning it. Then there's the 'snob effect', where people dismiss a product precisely because too many others are buying it,' said Aloysius Choong, a research manager with technology analyst firm IDC Asia-Pacific.

'In the case of the iPhone, the bandwagon effect appears to be dominating the snob effect,' he added.

According to IDC, the iPhone was the top-selling smart phone in Singapore in the fourth quarter of 2009.

'Singapore was the only market in the Asia-Pacific region, outside Korea and Japan, where Nokia was not number one in smart phones,' he told BT.

Like SingTel, StarHub and M1's profitability have taken an initial blow due to the large number of consumers who haven taken a bite at the smart phones such as the iPhone.

Earlier this month, StarHub cited higher handset subsidies for these models as a key reason for the 48.3 per cent drop in first quarter profits to $42.7 million. M1's Q1 net income dipped 6 per cent to $39.3 million.
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