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Author Topic: 'Worse Class' Transport  (Read 39988 times)
dapengmingwang
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« Reply #60 on: July 17, 2007, 10:43:19 AM »

Right.

So later they will say the fares for Circle Lines will be higher than the rest because of these systems...

Diew!!!

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Circle Line trains, tracks different from those deployed on the North-South and East-West lines
July 12, 2007

I REFER to the letter, 'Try out driverless trains along the Tanah Merah-Expo-Airport route' by Lim Poh Seng (ST, July 2).

The future Circle Line trains and its tracks are fundamentally different from the trains deployed on the North-South and East-West lines in terms of design specifications, signalling and communication systems, operating and control mechanisms as well as other technical features. Therefore, they would not be able to operate on the existing tracks that are customised for the current trains.

The Circle Line team, including SMRT, has conducted rigorous tests for the train system at a test track in France, prior to the delivery of the first Circle Line train in May last year. As more trains will be progressively delivered to Singapore over the next few years, the team is sparing no efforts in fine-tuning and testing the train systems to ensure we deliver user-friendly and reliable service when the Circle Line opens.

With regard to the suggestion of having a flexible number of train cars at different times, we would like to explain that the MRT trains as well as the various operating and control systems are not designed to operate as a three-car train. The six train cars are essential and integrated to run as one.

We thank the writer for his feedback.


Noelle Tang (Ms)
Manager, Corporate Marketing and Communications
SMRT Corporation Ltd
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #61 on: July 25, 2007, 10:50:59 AM »

Maybe because it's not made in China and they have spent god knows how many millions to 'reinvent a particular wheel' which has been invented in Hong Kong?

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Explain why it costs so much just to get a new ez-link card
July 19, 2007

FRESH out of national service, I was extremely excited as I anxiously await the start of my school term at a local university.

As tertiary students-to-be, we are all required to apply for an ez-link card, enabling us to buy monthly concession tickets for our buses and train rides.

Being a poly student previously, I am well aware of the high expenditure spent on transport as we no longer enjoy the 'standard price' for students in junior colleges/secondary schools, but full adult fares.

So as I went to a TransLink Ticket Office to apply for mine, I was shocked at how much I had to pay just to apply for the ez-link card.

Upfront, I had to pay $8, of which $5 is the 'card cost (non-refundable)' and $3 of 'personalisation fee'.

The customer service officer also told me that upon collection of the card, I can come back to 'unlock the card', which will cost me another $3 and only after unlocking the card can I start to use it.

All in all, it's a total of $11 even before I can even top up $10, which is the minimum amount going by adult fares.

Maybe the relevant authorities can explain the breakdown of this cost structure because I am sure many other fellow students-to-be would also like to find out why exactly is there a need to pay so much even before we can get to use the ez-link card.


Shen Shifa
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #62 on: August 04, 2007, 11:53:53 AM »

Well, thank you Mr Nerio. We will need more of you visiting foreigners to complain about the dismal services before they bloody wake up and do something about it.


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Rogue taxi drivers: A visitor's experience
July 28, 2007

I REFER to the article, 'Cabbies face mystery checks from LTA' (ST, July 25), and I want to share my experience as a tourist.

Taxi drivers refuse to take credit cards. This incident occurred when I was then coming back from Malaysia and flagged down a taxi late at night (the MRT was not operating).

What started out as a peaceful ride soon turned sour when the driver became very angry that I wanted to pay with my credit card.

I did not see any problem. After all, they advertise the acceptance of major credit cards on their cabs.

The taxi driver swiped two major credit cards and reported there was an 'error'. This was odd, considering I had just used the cards and they were working perfectly. In my opinion, the taxi driver might not have been pressing the right buttons or maybe even turned the machine off.

Nonetheless, he wouldn't take it, and became very angry. The taxi driver forced me to get back in the cab and drove around finding an ATM for me. He forced me to withdraw cash and pay him directly.

Yes, as you guessed it, I was able to withdraw money because the cards were working just fine. By the way, he charged me for the time it took to get to an ATM and withdraw money. But wait, it gets even better!

I went to the financial district for Bloomberg training. After I was done, I flagged down a Yellow Top taxi. The events that occurred next were shocking mainly because my life was endangered.

When I opened the door to enter the cab, I inserted my leg in to sit down. As I was doing this, I asked the driver if he would take credit card. Immediately the cab driver refused (although once again it was advertised that the cab takes major credit cards) and with my body half-way in the car, he drove off.

I could have been seriously injured, and I was furious and upset. I have never encountered such poor treatment, and being in a great city like Singapore, I was truly shocked. This cab driver drove off with my body half-way inside the cab simply because I demanded to receive service and pay with a credit card.

There was another problem, and this time I used cash. The driver would not change for $10. However, a colleague who was with me told me to sit still. We were not going anywhere until the cab driver started acting reasonably. After a five-minute wait inside the cab, he took my $10 and gave me change. The fare was about $3.50.

As a visitor to Singapore, I am still upset to this day and I avoid taxis whenever possible. I believe Singapore has a serious problem with its cab service, and am very relieved to know that Singapore is taking steps to crack down on errant cabbies.

I will be going back home to the States in a few weeks, and I will truly miss being in this great city, but one thing I will surely never miss, nor look forward returning to, is the notorious taxi service. I hope things will improve.


Micah Nerio
Texas, USA
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #63 on: August 07, 2007, 07:49:19 AM »

Why fine the bastards if they failed to live up to the standards?

Just deny them fare increments if they failed to deliver.

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A wait off your mind - More frequent buses during peak hours with new standards
Wednesday, August 1, 2007
 
Leong Wee Keat
weekeat@mediacorp.com.sg
 
COMING to a bus stop near you
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« Reply #64 on: August 08, 2007, 12:20:23 AM »

well ....
periodic fare increment = periodic increase tax revenue + likely increase investment returns,

fine = potential increase revenue ...

all in all ... the fine, like GST, will be pass down to the public one way or the other in form of cost ..... no matter they absorbed or wat ...


Why fine the bastards if they failed to live up to the standards?

Just deny them fare increments if they failed to deliver.


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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2007, 11:00:35 AM »

Why the hell should we continue to REWARD these recalcitrant fxxkwits to be where their business will be? Is it not their job to discover their markets? And now we have to pay them to be where their 'market' is?

Another world-class million dollar Tali-PAP 'idea' that doesn't solve the problem but goes towards increasing the bottom line of these blood sucking transport companies!!

Quote
['Worse Class' Transport]  MP proposes a new taxi surcharge
 Hedirman Supian, TODAY
 19 Nov 2007 1212 hrs (GMT + 8hrs)

SINGAPORE: Even as the Land Transport Authority brings out the big stick in its bid to rein in errant cabbies starting today, a Member of Parliament has proposed a peak-hour carrot - a "location surcharge" - to improve taxi services in areas with greater demand.

MP Seng Han Thong has suggested an additional sum for busy places like clubs, pubs, hotels, shopping malls and Raffles Place.

The root cause of soliciting, refusing to pick up passengers and overcharging lay in the pricing mechanism, he said, and errant cabbies resorted to such behaviour because demand for taxis exceeded the supply at certain times and places.

The MP, who is adviser to the six-affiliate Taxi Operators' Association, wrote in the latest edition of NTUC This Week: "Taxi companies need to impose surcharges at taxi stands in the CBD (central business district) and Orchard Road areas during peak hours, and at lobbies of hotels, major tourist attractions and nightspots."

He said: "Only location surcharges can address the problem of balancing the demand and supply of taxi services at specific places and time, while allowing taxis to charge a more affordable rate at other places such as HDB estates and neighbourhood shopping malls."

Singapore's approximately 45,000 taxi drivers have been getting a lot of bad press recently for soliciting, overcharging, meter-less rides, accepting advance bookings but not turning up, and refusing to pick passengers at taxi stands.

Effective today, the LTA will enforce harsher penalties on drivers for refusing to pick up passengers - a S$300 fine, six demerit points and an immediate two-week suspension.

Those guilty of touting will be docked 12 demerit points, fined S$500 and suspended for four weeks, while drivers caught overcharging by more than S$20 will have their licences withdrawn.

A TODAY reader complained recently that a taxi driver had charged him and his friend S$50 for a ride to Changi Airport from Boat Quay, while others said they were stood up by cabbies despite confirmed advance bookings.

But Mr Seng noted that the "silent majority" of taxi drivers were hardworking, making an honest living.

"We know that a very small group of errant taxi drives have given the Singapore taxi service a bad name whereas the silent majority is not as vocal as others in explaining the problems they have to face everyday," he wrote.

He said taxi drivers' biggest concern was the rapidly rising operating costs, which had increased to some S$780 a month.

"The pressure on them is immense because they have to work hard to earn the extras in order to settle these increases in operating costs," he said.

The parliamentarian's proposal did not sit too well with bunker trader Lynn Chong, who said: "No, there's enough surcharge. There's already a peak-hour charge. It already costs up to S$7 upfront if you take a cab in the CBD or town area during the peak hour." It will cost even more if one makes a call booking.

Ms Carol Loo, a financial adviser who spends between S$600 and S$800 a month on cabs, agreed, laying the blame on errant drivers who just cruise around waiting for call bookings. A price change will not make a dramatic effect.

She suggested that the taxi companies re-look their business models: "Their practices are lousy in the first place. A price fix won't be fair to people, they should be paying more for better service or quality."

But marketing undergraduate Nur Iskandar Malik welcomed the proposed increase during peak hours: "I wouldn't mind paying."

It would be better than having to wait in vain for a cab. Like many other long-suffering commuters, he will find out tonight if the LTA stick will see the return of the "disappearing" taxis during peak hours. - /ym TODAY
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« Reply #66 on: November 23, 2007, 07:50:42 AM »

Sometime I am confused.
Isn't over charging a fraud?
Isn't fraud a crime?

How can the best solution to overcome a rising crime be "to pay the criminals more" ?

Just sentence them to jail and a few cane.



Why the hell should we continue to REWARD these recalcitrant fxxkwits to be where their business will be? Is it not their job to discover their markets? And now we have to pay them to be where their 'market' is?

Another world-class million dollar Tali-PAP 'idea' that doesn't solve the problem but goes towards increasing the bottom line of these blood sucking transport companies!!

Quote
['Worse Class' Transport]  MP proposes a new taxi surcharge
 Hedirman Supian, TODAY
 19 Nov 2007 1212 hrs (GMT + 8hrs)

SINGAPORE: Even as the Land Transport Authority brings out the big stick in its bid to rein in errant cabbies starting today, a Member of Parliament has proposed a peak-hour carrot - a "location surcharge" - to improve taxi services in areas with greater demand.

MP Seng Han Thong has suggested an additional sum for busy places like clubs, pubs, hotels, shopping malls and Raffles Place.

The root cause of soliciting, refusing to pick up passengers and overcharging lay in the pricing mechanism, he said, and errant cabbies resorted to such behaviour because demand for taxis exceeded the supply at certain times and places.

The MP, who is adviser to the six-affiliate Taxi Operators' Association, wrote in the latest edition of NTUC This Week: "Taxi companies need to impose surcharges at taxi stands in the CBD (central business district) and Orchard Road areas during peak hours, and at lobbies of hotels, major tourist attractions and nightspots."

He said: "Only location surcharges can address the problem of balancing the demand and supply of taxi services at specific places and time, while allowing taxis to charge a more affordable rate at other places such as HDB estates and neighbourhood shopping malls."

.............

. - /ym TODAY

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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #67 on: April 08, 2008, 09:53:09 PM »

Obviously, either no one asked many of us how we felt about the SMRT, or those comments which are negative, are just ignored...

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SMRT wins international award for "Best Passenger Experience"

SINGAPORE: Transport operator SMRT has clinched the "Best Passenger Experience" award at the inaugural Metro Awards 2008 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Metro Awards is part of MetroRail, an annual conference of the urban rail industry worldwide which met from 1 to 3 April this year.

Other finalists of the "Best Passenger Experience" award included Copenhagen Metro, MTR Corporation Limited (Hong Kong) and The Warsaw Metro Ltd.

They were judged on factors such as value for money, efficiency and reliability, as well as cleanliness and security.

SMRT said the international award for service excellence came shortly after it won the "Most Customer-Friendly Transport" award, presented by Singapore
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #68 on: July 17, 2011, 06:55:47 AM »

Why Taipei's MRT trumps Singapore's
MONDAY, 22 DECEMBER 2008 10:13

TAIPEI'S CITY Hall is so proud of its mass rapid transit (MRT) system that it runs a competition every year, asking people to send in poems about the MRT. I can see why. The MRT is clean and comfortable (in addition to chewing gum, the nasty habit of betel chewing nut has been banned). People queue up in a civilised fashion before boarding trains. And, when the doors open, they don't barge in before passengers can exit.
 
Signs and announcements are in Chinese and English and all carriages have electronic displays showing which station is coming up next. Every carriage has special seats for old folks, pregnant women or people with disabilities. I've never seen fit, young people pretending to be asleep in these seats.
 
However, the best part about Taipei's MRT is its frequency. According to Taipei Rapid Transit Corp (TRTC), the company that runs the system, trains arrive at two to four-minute intervals at peak hours. Off-peak, it is four to seven minutes.
 
In reality, it is much more frequent. I know because I've timed it. At peak hours, trains come as often as every minute. As for off-peak hours? Well, I've never had to wait more than three or four minutes. As a result, even during the morning rush hour, the trains are never as packed as they are in Singapore.
 
TRTC has won praise not just locally but internationally. It has been ranked No 1 for reliability for four straight years (2004 to 2007), according to the Nova/CoMET International Railway Benchmarking Group (of which Singapore's SMRT Corp is also part).
 
All this got me wondering just how TRTC is able to deliver such a world-class MRT service. Perhaps, it doesn't have to transport as many people as in the crowded Lion City? Perhaps, it's government-owned and isn't under pressure to make as much money as possible and can run more trains?
 
So, I pulled up some numbers (see table). And the broad conclusion is that Taipei proves it is possible to offer a high-quality, high-frequency and affordable MRT service without losing money. It also suggests that certain services, such as public transport, tend to function optimally as natural monopolies and ought not to be owned by companies that seek to maximise profits.
 
Let's look first at the one common element between the two: the cost of taking a train. Average ticket prices in Singapore and Taipei are about $1. This is pretty low by international standards, as anyone who has had the misfortune to take the London Underground knows.
 
Singapore and Taipei are also pretty dense cities, but the latter packs more folks (5.5 million of them) into a smaller area (272 sq km). In comparison, Singapore is home to 4.6 million residents spread over some 692 sq km.
 
As such, in terms of coverage, Singapore's network of five MRT lines is more extensive, totalling 109.4km, versus TRTC's 74.4km network. However, TRTC has more stations on its smaller network, which means less distance between stations and greater convenience for commuters.

 
MORE TRAIN RUNS IN TAIPEI
Just how many people take the MRT each day? In 2007, Singapore's MRT moved an average of 1.56 million people a day. That's just over a third more than what TRTC transported last year. So yes, TRTC's network is smaller and it moves fewer people, which is one reason it feels less crowded.
 
However, what is illuminating is the difference in frequency. Last year, TRTC made an average of 2,171 train runs a day. SMRT clocked in at just over 1,000 a day for its fiscal year ended March 2008. This is not strictly an apples with apples comparison. SMRT's system is older, has heavier loads and travels further than TRTC's
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