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Author Topic: 'Worse Class' Transport  (Read 39991 times)
dapengmingwang
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« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2006, 10:27:33 PM »

Motorists face extra ERP charge if they head to Suntec

SINGAPORE: The road closures in and around Suntec Singapore are making some motorists see red. 
- snipped -
LTA added this is a temporary inconvenience till the roads re-open after 20th September, when the meetings end.

This is full of shit.

THe matter is more than just inconvenience. Why should motorists pay for the LTA's oversight?

Just how much more revenue is the LTA getting out of this?


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« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2006, 01:24:32 AM »

Because the despicable f*ckers are running trains at intervals that ensure everyone of them are packed to be 85% full. (1200 out of 1400).

So, if the trains become less than 85% full between Yishun and Jurong East, it's better to turn them around where it WILL BE 85% full instead of having them running to Jurong East at less than 'optimum capacity' instead.

That's SMRT's idea of 'Worse Class' Transport for you, Mr Oh.


Quote
Too many trains end at Yishun
      
I AM writing to express my frustration and disappointment with SMRT.

As a resident of Yishun, I take the MRT to work every morning. However, I noticed that a high proportion of trains (three to four at one go) have their service terminated at Yishun Station, for every two to three trains that continue on to Jurong East.

This is causing inconvenience and frustration to commuters who have to wait at least seven to eight minutes during the morning peak hour.

Making commuters wait so long during the rush hour, resulting in packed trains, goes against our aim to have a world-class transport system.

With the announcement of increased bus and MRT fares, will there be an improvement in service standards? When will bus and train operators understand that higher fares have to be justified by better service?

Shouldn't transport, a public good, be managed by the Government, instead of by profit-driven entities?

I have a couple of questions for SMRT: Why is there a need to terminate a train service in the middle of a commuter's journey? Why can't SMRT space out trains that terminate at different stations?


Samuel Oh Chee Ooi
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« Reply #32 on: September 21, 2006, 03:31:26 AM »

There's no use stating what's obvious and well thought out.

It is more effective to transform such thoughts into action: Votes for the opposition.

66.6% isn't going to tell the TalePAP to wake up its ideas.


Quote
Transport systems in other countries are more costly to run than Singapore's
      
I refer to the article 'Hike in fares reasonable: GPC chief' (ST, Sept 13) and Mr Chionh Chye Kit's letter 'Are S'pore fares really that much cheaper?' (ST, Sept 15).

I fully agree with Mr Chionh's view that statistics quoted by the Public Transport Council (PTC) are not a proper comparison between Singapore's public transport system and those of other major cities.

Having lived in the United Kingdom (London included) for a year, I can attest that public transport there is much more expensive than in Singapore. However, what must be taken into consideration is the vast area that the transport network covers.

London and New York City have populations of eight million each and Hong Kong seven million, many of which rely heavily on public transport systems to get about their daily lives.

On top of having to cope with more commuters than Singapore, the transport networks in these cities cover significantly larger areas than Singapore's. The London Underground covers an urbanised area of 4,147 sq km, the New York Subway 7,690 sq km and the even tiny Hong Kong's MTR dwarfs Singapore's at 1,042 sq km. Singapore's total land area is 682 sq km.

Furthermore, these transport systems run through expensive routes such as tunnels under the Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong and under the Thames in London. The underground system in London (1863) and New York City (1904) are also far more antiquated than Singapore's MRT.

Age, land area and geographical difficulty make maintenance and the running of such transport systems more costly than Singapore's compact MRT or SBS services.

With these factors in mind, it is no wonder that nominal prices in other world class cities are more expensive than Singapore's.


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« Reply #33 on: September 27, 2006, 12:21:31 AM »

Regularly is now often?

Everyday? And all of you does it?


Quote
PTC members take public transport regularly, too

Letter from Looi Teik Soon
Secretary
Public Transport Council

 
I REFER to the letter "Let them ride trains, buses" (Sept 22) by Mr Nicholas Ng.

Members of the Public Transport Council (PTC) are drawn from a wide cross-section of society, including the grassroots organisations, labour unions, professional services, business enterprises, media and academic institutions.

They play an active role in the PTC's delib- erations on public transport matters, including fare adjustment.

The PTC places great importance on understanding commuters' experiences and the operations of public transport.

We take all feedback and suggestions seriously. Moreover, contrary to Mr Ng's perception, some members of the Council are in fact frequent users of public transport.

I thank Mr Ng for his suggestion.

Members of the public are welcome to email us directly at our dedicated email address (ptc@www.ptc.gov.sg) if they have any suggestions to make.
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« Reply #34 on: October 02, 2006, 08:16:13 PM »

What should really be done is to let SMRT run the bus on the N-E Line, and SBS Transit to run buses on the E-W / N-S lines.

Then there's some 'real' competition.

Quote
SBS Transit, SMRT should compete for East-West bus routes

Letter from colin tan weijian
 
Currently, the most efficient mode of transport between the extreme eastern and western parts of Singapore is by train.

However, the journey is very time- consuming with many stops in between. For example, travelling from Pasir Ris/Tampines to Jurong East/Boon Lay by MRT will take slightly more than an hour. Travelling from Punggol/Sengkang to Boon Lay takes close to an hour.

For Singaporeans working in the west
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« Reply #35 on: October 19, 2006, 11:17:42 AM »

Cost more to use nevermind.

Still break down often.

'World Class' indeed.

Quote
Stretch of NEL service disrupted after midday breakdown
 By S Ramesh, Channel NewsAsia
 Posted: 17 October 2006 0013 hrs


SINGAPORE : A stretch of the North East Line has been restored after it broke down for nearly an hour at midday on Monday.

Confirming the breakdown, Comfort Delgro said the northbound track between Potong Pasir and Hougang was affected by the disruption.

Kovan and Serangoon stations were also closed because of the breakdown.

About 20 people were on board the train when the incident happened.

Comfort Delgro is investigating the cause of the breakdown. - CNA/de
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« Reply #36 on: November 10, 2006, 11:50:41 PM »

Kevin Lim F*ck Meng may want to know that if he tries taking the train from Pasir Ris, it's probably jammed pack probably even before Bedok. (Similarly, one taking a train from Boon Lay, will find it jammed pack after Clementi.)

Commuters are simply left with the choice of being late for work, or having an uncomfortable ride to work.

66.6%. That's the price to pay.


Quote
Figures on usage of trains are misleading
      
HAVING failed many times to get on-board trains during peak hours and finding myself squeezed like a sardine even when I take a train home at 11.30 pm, I wonder if the figures cited by SMRT and SBS Transit provide an accurate picture of the usage of the MRT.

An 80 per cent utilisation during peak hours may sound very reasonable until one considers that more people take the train into the Central Business District in the morning than leave the city for the suburbs. Also, while the MRT may run all the way from Pasir Ris to Raffles Place, many people board the train at places like Bedok and Paya Lebar. This means the train cannot be jam-packed after going past two or three stations.

If the authorities are serious about promoting the use of public transport, they must not allow public transport operators to hide behind broad and misleading usage figures.

Instead, the authorities should set a narrow yardstick based on the utililisation rate for trains when they are near the city centre, the average time a person has to wait to board a train at City Hall or Raffles Place during evening peak hours, and the number of hours in the day when people with infants can safely use the train, in order that trains are a viable and comfortable alternative to cars.


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« Reply #37 on: November 19, 2006, 02:34:47 AM »

Are Singaporeans spoilt?

According to these kriffing mofos... we are 'spoilt' because it's alot worst in these other cities.

Doesn't matter when population of these cities according to (according to Wikipedia) are:

  • Tokyo: 8,483,140
  • London: 7,517,700
  • New York City: 8,143,197


 * these figures just state the people living IN the city, not including people who will go to the city to work from the surrounding areas.


Compare that to Singapore: 4,408,220.

Slightly more than half that of London. Now, how about comparing apples with apples for starters, say... Sydney or Los Angeles?


Quote
Yes, they are
We asked three people who have spent more than a decade using the most well-known train systems in the world - in Tokyo, London and New York - to judge

Try Tokyo 's peak-hour, body-crushing ride
Friday, 8.30am, Kembangan station

Mr Norman Chong, 47, executive creative director, a Singaporean who has lived in Tokyo for 10 years


'THE Singapore trains may be crowded but the situation is nothing compared to Tokyo's peak-hour trains. There, the trains are so packed that bodies are crushed against one another. I call this my regular morning massage.

When the trains pull into the station, you can see faces squashed against the glass door. Sometimes, getting onto the Tokyo trains is such a squeeze that handbags and umbrellas get trapped in between the train doors.

But in Singapore, no matter how packed it is, everyone still has some personal space. There's no body contact, much less the body-crushing you get in Tokyo.

Even then, I prefer travelling on the Tokyo trains. Unlike Singaporeans, the Japanese are particular about personal hygiene. They don't have body odour and there are no wet, smelly bodies pressing against you.

The only thing you smell is shampoo from the women's hair. The women in Singapore don't care for their hair properly. My Japanese friends who visit Singapore can't stand the smell in the trains here.

If the Singapore trains ever get as crowded as the Tokyo trains, I'll switch to taking cabs.'





Much better than the London Tube
Friday, 8.30am, Bishan station

Mr James Hosking, 33, worked as a business development manager in England before moving to Singapore last month.


'EVEN though I think the London Tube has improved, trains are definitely way better here.

I don't think Singaporeans have anything to complain about, although human nature being what it is, people are bound to always find something wrong.

The trains here don't get too full and are more regular than those in London.

Also, they seem to be better here at scheduling maintenance work. They do it outside peak hours.

And the peak times are shorter than in London. You would never get the kind of space at 9am there that you do here.

Also, I don't think I've ever seen a working air-conditioner on any train in London.

You don't need it in winter but in summer it can get a bit hot. People actually used to faint. It was a health hazard.

If there's one thing that I would give the Brits, it's that they are very good at letting people off before they board the train, just like they are good with keeping left on an escalator.

But I guess since nobody here gets stuck on the train, then it doesn't become an issue.'






Trains skip stations in NY when too crowded
Friday, 8.30am, Redhill station

Business development executive L. Yu, in her 30s, lived in New York for 14 years before moving to Singapore in April this year


'ON THE New York subway, I sometimes have to stand on tiptoe and touch the ceiling to stabilise myself.

Here, I can at least find something to hold on to, so I wouldn't say it's crowded at all. The number of people in this train would be normal by New York standards, and is equivalent to an off-peak crowd in Shanghai.

In both those cities, the trains are so packed during peak hours you can hardly reach for your mobile phone because there is no elbow space.

When it gets too crowded in New York and the trains cannot take any more passengers, they even skip stations and stop only at main stops.

Also there is no air-conditioning on the platforms in New York. During summer, people are sweating and fanning themselves and when a train comes, these sweaty people use their suitcases and handbags to push to get in. Sure it can be dangerous, but you cannot fall down because you just fall onto other people.

In comparison, it is so comfortable here. Ever since coming to Singapore, I think I have become spoilt too.'
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« Reply #38 on: November 20, 2006, 12:11:15 AM »

On the whole I do not have to much complaints on how pack or comfortable regarding our train rides .... after all I have been through the days on non-aircon buses, with even only 1 entrance, and NO DOOR (or door not close) with commuters have to even stand on the stairs of the open doors while traveling.

i am a little unhappy on the longer waiting time at times, sometime reaching 11min, but on the whole I can still live with it.

What I really cannot stand it the poor connection of train-transits at interchanges like Citi Hall or Raffles Place .... when (eg) the North->South train arrives at Raffles place just at the moment when the connecting East->West train signals to close the door. Yes and if you try to rush for it, you arrive at the doors opposite just when the doors closed.

If the so called world's classs system is unable to synchronise the two both trains, they should at least adjust the arrival to be at intervals.

Frequencies, comfort level etc are related to profit/loss and fine I can make do ... but the poor connection of trains in this case is simply poor logistics, and the fact that this is happening day after day, year after day simply means there is nothing done on the improvement.


Are Singaporeans spoilt?

According to these kriffing mofos... we are 'spoilt' because it's alot worst in these other cities.

Doesn't matter when population of these cities according to (according to Wikipedia) are:

  • Tokyo: 8,483,140
  • London: 7,517,700
  • New York City: 8,143,197


 * these figures just state the people living IN the city, not including people who will go to the city to work from the surrounding areas.


Compare that to Singapore: 4,408,220.

Slightly more than half that of London. Now, how about comparing apples with apples for starters, say... Sydney or Los Angeles?

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« Reply #39 on: November 20, 2006, 03:18:47 AM »

Oh that. I have complained about that when I worked in Toa Payoh and I decided (against common sense so I can get a seat) to take the train of the N-S Line down from Jurong East instead. I have noticed that the N-S line train pulls out of station just when mine was pulling in on the E-W line. That was 1997 - 1998 so the problem you are talking about is almost a good 10 years old.

Truth be told, if they don't give me the crap of it being a 'World Class Service' and that crap that they are increasing fares to 'improve service', I wouldn't really give a flying damn about the train intervals, and how packed it is.

After all. I have been on buses since the days when they have no doors, are non air-conditioned and still have a bus conductor!! And now that you have mentioned this, add that to the list of things I am unhappy about this blasted 'Worst Class Transport'.


On the whole I do not have to much complaints on how pack or comfortable regarding our train rides .... after all I have been through the days on non-aircon buses, with even only 1 entrance, and NO DOOR (or door not close) with commuters have to even stand on the stairs of the open doors while traveling.

i am a little unhappy on the longer waiting time at times, sometime reaching 11min, but on the whole I can still live with it.

What I really cannot stand it the poor connection of train-transits at interchanges like Citi Hall or Raffles Place .... when (eg) the North->South train arrives at Raffles place just at the moment when the connecting East->West train signals to close the door. Yes and if you try to rush for it, you arrive at the doors opposite just when the doors closed.

If the so called world's classs system is unable to synchronise the two both trains, they should at least adjust the arrival to be at intervals.

Frequencies, comfort level etc are related to profit/loss and fine I can make do ... but the poor connection of trains in this case is simply poor logistics, and the fact that this is happening day after day, year after day simply means there is nothing done on the improvement.
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« Reply #40 on: December 07, 2006, 01:11:27 AM »

That would be nice and in a perfect world, it is the best solution. But unfortunately, this isn't a perfect world which means if you remove the surcharges entirely, then where is the money for the company to maintain the booking service going to come from?

So, the next best solution would be to maintain the surcharge but to put a burden on the cab drivers to turn up on time, with the penalty of losing his surcharge if he misses his target time. This can certainly be done using the GPS enabled 'Satellite booking unit' in the cab, which would make the surcharge applicable once the cab is within 5m of the pick up point before the appointed them. If the customer failed to turn up at the appointed time then it's not the fault of the driver.

And to prevent the cab driver from running away if he failed to arrive on time, there should be the  penalty of barring a cab driver from getting cab bookings for failing to turn up after accepting a call for say, 1 hour because the company has to book another taxi and face the wrath of an irate customer.

It's high time a system be in place to even the playing field for the commuters and not subject them entirely to the mercy of the taxi drivers.


Quote
Retain call bookings but abolish surcharge
      
MANY letters have been written about the poor service of taxi drivers, and frustrations with the taxi industry. Yet, the situation has not improved and is, in fact, getting more severe.

I agree with Mr Chew Boon Keong ('Taxi service: Surcharge is king, not passenger'; ST, Nov 27) that the taxi industry has become surcharge-oriented.

The use of surcharges has exacerbated the shortage of taxis, during both peak and non-peak hours, as drivers would rather wait for calls than pick up passengers in the street.

Abolishing the call-booking surcharge would increase competition between drivers as there will be no incentive for them to wait for calls and they have to pick up customers in the street.

But retain call bookings. Without a surcharge, more people would be encouraged to make use of the service and taxi drivers could choose to take up such bookings rather than drive around looking for customers.

The dire state of the taxi service affects both locals and foreigners as it is an unreliable mode of transport. Moreover, it will have an adverse impact on the tourism industry as tourists become frustrated with not being able to get a taxi.

It is the duty of the authorities - the Ministry of Transport and the Land Transport Authority - to exert pressure on the taxi companies to improve and ensure high service levels.

Unless they do so, we have a long way to go before we can claim to have a world-class public-transportation system.


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« Reply #41 on: January 13, 2007, 12:13:40 AM »

Bus 51 is one of the worst service in existence and it has one of the most roundabout routes of all buses.

From the other end, it runs from Jurong East to Pasir Panjang, then back towards Alexandra and Queensway and then down Commonwealth Road before it rejoins Alexandra Road back towards the CBD.

And that's only HALF the trip if you are heading to Hougang from Jurong East.


Quote
Old woman helpless on bus full of uncaring passengers
Jan 13, 2007
      
I TOOK a single-deck SBS bus No. 51 (SBS 237) to work on Friday, Jan 5 at about 7.50am. Since it was peak hour, the bus was considerably filled with passengers. I got on at the first bus stop after the bus left the terminal in Hougang Central Interchange.

Half an hour into the journey, the bus was already crammed full of passengers with barely space to turn, yet the bus driver kept stopping at every stop to pick up more passengers.

During this period, a frail thin elderly woman in her 60s standing no more than 1.5m tall boarded the bus. Inevitably, she was clustered around by passengers. Standing smack between other bodies, she could barely get a firm grip on the head rest of a seat occupied by passengers half her age. As the bus lurched and jerked along, there were a number of times she nearly fell. The bus driver made it worse by forcing passengers to move towards the rear so he could pick up more passengers even though there was hardly space. The poor old woman was bundled around helplessly. All this while, no seated passenger bothered to give up his seat. Only 30 minutes into the journey, the seated young and middle-aged men and women were already transcending into oblivion, I think.

When the bus drew near Ubi Driving Centre, the old woman began to shiver and her legs shook so much, they were hardly able to support her. Her hands were losing their grip though she tried her best to hold on. Her head started to tilt upwards and her eyes began to close. She had turned pale and was gasping for breath. Involuntarily, she sank till she was almost kneeling on the floor but the passengers standing around her only stared at her and edged away. Some of those seating were watching how she crumpled.

I reached out to help her but was only able to extend one hand as I was blocked by another standing passenger who was watching the action unfold. Another woman next to her also tried to hold her steady but was also constrained by non-moving 'meat'. An elderly uncle standing next to me had to ask those sitting down to give her their seat in Hokkien. But no one stirred and they still had the audacity to either pretend nothing was happening or continue their pious meditation.

I had to shout at the selective-hearing people in the seats to move one pair of gluteus maximus for the old woman. Finally, one of them heard and gave up her seat to the old woman who had to be helped to sit down. The woman who gave up her seat applied medicated oil to the old woman who was in a daze. During the commotion, the bus driver continued to shout at us to move in more to accommodate more passengers.

To the management of SBS Transit, what is considered a safe full load on a single-deck bus? How does the bus driver know when the bus is full? Why is a single-deck bus used to ply the No. 51 route during morning peak hour when the route is long and there are so many passengers?

Except for three standing passengers and one seated woman on the bus who helped the old woman, none of the people in the front half of the bus lifted a finger. If we cannot even lift a finger to help one of our own, we, as educated adults in an educated developed nation, have failed.


Fabian Chia Choon Liang
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« Reply #42 on: January 15, 2007, 03:55:56 AM »

Well, the ballot box.

Tell your MP, if they don't fix the public transport, you vote opposition.

Since the opposition can't fix it and the ruling party won't fix it, it doesn't make a difference to you if you vote the opposition. But it won't make a lot of difference to the fxxkers who can fix it because if they don't get enough votes, they won't be still earning their easy money.

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Long wait for packed feeder bus despite assurances given
Letter from Chua Kim Choo
Monday, January 15, 2007
 
IT WAS announced last year that bus operators would have to pull up their socks and improve to meet new service standards set. Bus commuters were invited to send their feedback about waiting times and overcrowding.

Yishun residents in Neighbourhood 6 rely on feeder service 812 to connect the train at Yishun MRT station. I have written many times to SMRT since 2002. But the service shows no improvement despite assurances to the contrary.

Of late, the feeder service has been irregular and it is common to wait for more than 15 minutes.

It has been even worse since the schools reopened. Along the route, there are many schools, the latest addition being Chung Cheng Secondary.

No additional service was introduced to serve the residents even though the buses are always loaded with students going to school in the morning.

As such, when the bus reaches the first stop along Yishun Street 61, it is fully packed. With residents getting on board, the buses are filled to the doorsteps.

On Friday morning, I had to wait for more than 20 minutes and, when the bus came, I had to squeeze in even though it was full. Otherwise, I would have been late for work.

The previous day, there was frustration when some commuters had to call for taxis after waiting for a long time at the bus stop.

It is not cheap to travel on these feeder services and the fares continue to increase, but this does not seem accompanied by any improvement in services.

May I appeal to the relevant authorities to tell us where else - besides the transport operators - we can lodge our complaints about bad service, long waiting times and overcrowding?
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« Reply #43 on: February 14, 2007, 08:28:11 PM »

Not very often you can find such a well written letter.


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« Reply #44 on: April 16, 2007, 10:47:20 PM »

Each and everytime they will threaten us that there will be a huge cost to do so... and that the burden will be passed to commuters.

I say, SHOW US THE BILL.

Let us scruntinise it, and we'll decide if we can afford it.

And BTW, Kanniah-ryn Lau... Concession is not the same as FREE. Geddit?


Quote
Tall kids can enjoy concession travel with Child ez-link card
April 17, 2007
      
WE REFER to the letter, 'Bus fare policy unfair to tall kids' (Online forum, April 9).

We would like to share that the original criteria for free travel applied to only infants in arms. The public transport operators had later extended free travel to children whose height is up to 0.9m and accompanied by a fare-paying commuter.

With the introduction of the MRT system, sensors were installed in the fare gates for the safety of commuters so as to prevent the gates from closing on a commuter passing through.

The sensors, installed at 0.9m, will detect only the fare-paying commuter passing through the fare gate, and the child below 0.9m may pass through safely and without having to pay a fare.

If the height limit were to be increased to above 0.9m, there would be huge costs incurred to change all the fare gates and sensors throughout the MRT and LRT system. This would adversely impact the full-fare paying commuters.

The existing height limit of 0.9m for children to travel free is in accordance with the height regulations gazetted for fare payments by children travelling on public transport.

Children above 0.9m in height and below seven years old are eligible for travel concession with a Child ez-link card. Hence, pre-schoolers, regardless of height, are able to enjoy travel concession with a Child ez-link card.

In Mr Teo's case, his daughter can enjoy concession travel using a Child ez-link card on both bus and train. Child ez-link cards can be purchased from any TransitLink Ticket Office.

Information on Child ez-link cards is readily available at TransitLink website www.transitlink.com.sg or by calling toll-free TransitLink Hotline at 1800-CALL ONE (1800-2255 663).

In Singapore, public bus and train services are provided on a commercial basis. All concessionary fares are effectively cross-subsidised by full-fare paying commuters.

The non-concession fares paid by full fare paying commuters go towards covering the discounts given in concession fares. Thus, in the interests of the full-fare paying commuters, the public transport operators and TransitLink exercise prudence when granting any further travel concession beyond the present arrangement.

We thank the reader for sharing his feedback and hope that we have addressed his concerns.


Kathryn Lau (Ms)
Assistant Corporate Communications Manager
Transit Link Pte Ltd
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我終於知道曲終人散的寂寞 只有傷心人才有...
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