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Author Topic: 'Worse Class' Transport  (Read 39987 times)
SanNiang
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« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2006, 10:50:03 PM »

There is this thing that I really wish they (the 2 train operator) can improve on - sending out the news of service break down.

I am now receiving SMS and emails (i personally call them spam) on advertisment from them, like take SMRT and win Plasma TV. I do not want to talk on issues of such spams here, but clearly they do have my contacts readily.

I would really wish they can SMS me and email me on the break down of train service like the one on NE line near Outram station a few days ago.

I do now know of the rest of people but I sure prefer to make alternative route way ahead before I have reach the station.

Yes maybe that will again add a reason of further fair increase ... but to me this is a service uplift.

$0.05 per SMS is $50k per million SMS sent out. Unless they need to send such break down notification once a month (so they broke down once a month?Huh?) I do not see a surge in cost actually, since the SMS facility is already in place (since they already sending me the prmotion events SMS).
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2006, 12:44:51 AM »

Because you can't be responsive to profitability at the same time.

And given the fact that this shit of a gover-min and its rubber stamp the PTC JUSTIFIES the transport operators' need to be profitable - and this being a state which people fears even any hint of welfare - it is clear that the commuter's welfare, i.e. availability and as a result - travel comfort -  is irrelevant.

After all, no one says affordability = comfort.

And if the blasted mini$ter$, or the LTA, or the shithead PRs of the transport operators wanna tell me it is comfortable, they can come and join me (sans their security detail) to use the blasted system for a year as many times as I would need it. And after a year and they have no complaints, I'll give it to them that it is not only 'affordable', but 'comfortable' as well.

As it stands, I doubt they would be able to take even a month of use on our Worse Class Transport without a mental breakdown!!

And now there's another impending fare raise, and yet again CASE is silent. We definitely don't need a consumer's association that places certain political agenda above that of the consumers!

Quote
Why can't public transport operators be more responsive to commuter travel patterns?
      
SINGAPORE'S public transport operators are myopic, and penny-wise but pound-foolish.

They do not provide enough feeders in terms of numbers and frequencies direct to key nodal MRT stations to encourage people to travel more frequently and cut down on their travelling time.

Weekends are about the only time Singaporeans have to go shopping and visiting. Yet on Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons when people throng to go shopping, and weekend evenings when they rush to go home - train and bus services seem oblivious to this demand and frequencies appear to be at non-peak long time intervals.

On Sunday nights, one waits very long for buses to arrive to go home. When they come, they are packed to the brim until you cannot board. Many foreign construction workers are caught in this weekend night crush.

Why can't public transport operators be more responsive to commuter travel patterns? If only they are more willing to shorten bus and train frequencies, travel demand will go up by 10 to 20 per cent, which will more than offset electricity and manpower overhead costs.

Why not make public transport a seamless breeze so people will enjoy travelling, and both locals and visitors can rely on superb public transport to traverse all points of the island to enjoy all Singapore has to offer?

We should not wait for commuter demand to justify an increase in bus and train frequencies, but rather first provide a faster public transport network at all times - both peak and non-peak - to stimulate more commuter travel demand.


Dr Lim Boon Hee
« Last Edit: July 26, 2006, 01:22:35 AM by Grievous » Logged

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moshedyan
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« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2006, 02:14:14 AM »

there were ONCED
a day
where
the whole world should stopped
using their personal cars
just for
ONE day
in order to save fuel and earth envoiroment
guess what?
the ministers
the rc
the government sectors
all still driving their cars
on that day
when they want us
to take the
public transports
to show world wide supports
see?
walk the talk
nabei eh?
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #18 on: July 26, 2006, 09:54:37 PM »

For Ena Tan, the matter's really got nothing to do with the PTC. It's political, if Serangoon North is part of Hougang SMC. Bwaghahahaa...

And I forgot to mention. Fines are useless because it only goes into increasing the gover-min coffers, does not really improve the situation and does nothing to alleviate the pain suffered by the aggrieved commuters!

Quote
Guidelines include fines for operators of buses that are late too many times

COME September, commuters should not need to wait more than 15 minutes for a bus during peak hours.

Operators whose buses fail to come on time at least eight in 10 times could be fined up to $100,000 under a new set of service standards kicking in by then.

The new standards, drawn up from commuters' feedback, set benchmarks for key aspects of service, such as arrival times and the availability of up-to-date bus information.

The Public Transport Council (PTC) unveiled 19 such parameters yesterday.

They will come into force in September, but the PTC said it would give SBS Transit and SMRT Buses six months from then to meet the new service standards.

After that, the penalties for flouting them get steep.

The 15-member council, an independent body which regulates bus services and public transport fares, can fine errant bus operators if service quality dips for no satisfactory reason.

Getting buses to run on time and ensuring that they are not overcrowded are big priorities, since many commuter complaints are related to this - hence the new 15-minute peak period waiting time, and the requirement that bus services be no more than 95% full on average during such hours.

Other requirements include giving up-to-date route and schedule information through hotlines, websites and posted schedules at bus stops.

Yesterday, PTC chairman Gerard Ee said the revised standards give a better measure of operators' performance. The existing benchmarks, already 12 years old, focused more on the length, accessibility and directness of bus routes.

The new standards are also part of a continuing effort to have operators deliver better service to commuters, he said.

He added that the PTC was also expecting bus operators to be more responsive to commuter feedback.

'For instance, if there is feedback on specific service lapses, the bus operator should promptly explain the circumstances of the occurrences and take corrective measures,' he said.

SBS Transit and SMRT both welcomed the new standards.

SBS Transit's executive director, Mr Ong Boon Leong, said: 'The new standards will act as a new goalpost for us, spurring us to do even better than we have done before. This is a good thing - not just for us, but for the industry as a whole.'

He added that SBS Transit would keep up its efforts to improve, as it has done in the past 18 months with 31 new services.

Commuter Ena Tan, 41, a stay-at-home mum who takes the bus from her Serangoon North home with her two school-age children, hopes the new standards will force an improvement in public transport in her estate, where only two bus services run.

She said: 'The service is erratic and the bus takes ages to come. I hope putting more buses, even in smaller estates like mine, will improve the situation.'

The deputy chairman of the Government Parliamentary Committee for Transport, Mr Ong Kian Min, said the new standards will place an obligation on operators to give better service.

But he has a worry: 'The concern is whether compliance with these requirements may in turn lead to higher operating costs and higher fares in the future.'

The two bus operators have indicated plans to ask the PTC for a bus fare hike and hope to implement new fares in October.

The PTC has given the assurance that if it gives the green light for the hike, the increase will be capped at 1.7%, or one to two cents more per ride.

The most recent hike, implemented last year, was bigger - 2.4%.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2006, 10:35:35 PM by Grievous » Logged

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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2006, 11:49:53 PM »

But getting people to take the MRT is the idea, Mr Gleissner.

And you aren't the only one talking about just how terrible taxi service is in Singapore. A lady in my office, from HK as well, made that comment less than a week after relocating here from HK. She has since requested to be relocated BACK to HK.

And is it a surprise why Singapore seem to lost its luster as a financial center, with many financial institutions moving back to Hong Kong today? Even Shanghai isn't as shining as before in terms of market capitalisation!

Of course Baby Lee, the Dragon Prince, Lord of the MAS, won't be telling you about this fiasco to diminish the aura of the mighty fami-lee. And I ain't saying that bad taxis are the reason for people moving out of Singapore, just saying that, HK has reinvented itself since SARS.

Singapore... we didn't even dare think of a day without the TalePAP.

Quote
Much easier to get a taxi in Hong Kong than in Singapore
      
AS ONE of many executives with business interests in both Hong Kong and Singapore, the infrastructure of both places has a lot of similarities. Transport infrastructure is excellent, much better than in many Western European countries, and certainly the United States. Mass transport is clean, punctual, fast and reliable. Many features are similar - though under different names. MRT here is MTR there, Octopus there is ez-link here and so on.

What surprises me is how poorly the taxi system here compares to Hong Kong. In all major parts of the city, getting a taxi in Hong Kong is as easy as raising your hand, and chances are within one or two minutes one will stop. If not directly on your road, a taxi that is available and sees a customer will make an effort to pick him up.

Not so in Singapore. Not only do available taxis seem to ignore potential customers who try to flag them down, but they also frequently make a pickup dependent on the destination, as if the customer is appreciated only if his route is 'convenient' to the driver. The roles of customer and service provider seem to be reversed.

And to avoid long taxi queues, there seems to be a solution to 'call' a taxi and be charged more. I beg your pardon: Why should I pay more for telling the taxi where his business is? I should get a rebate for that.

It seems many taxi drivers just pass on jobs in the hope that someone will call, so they make more money from the passenger for virtually treating customers badly. But strangely, this changes dramatically when one carries a travel suitcase, so the driver will get a lucrative fare to the airport.

I say thanks, but no thanks to such an attitude. And for my trips to and from the airport, I now use the MRT.


Michael Gleissner
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moshedyan
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« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2006, 03:42:17 AM »

to work in shanghai
required more skills and qualification
than to apply for a work permit in singapore
don't even think of that
by the way
shanghai foreign talent taxes is 40 percent
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pazzaxdio
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« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2006, 11:49:35 PM »

*BEEPBEEPBEEP* Make your life mobile with M1. 1 Life. Live it. *BEEPBEEPBEEP*

I still have it ringing in my head.  Sad Couldn't they give commuters peace? I know not all commuters travel from one end of the line to the other....but still, peace after a long hard day at work would be nice without getting slapped with ads - visual and audio...
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moshedyan
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« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2006, 02:59:52 AM »

irregardless of buses,smrt, or taxi
how about granting permits
for electric bicycle liked this one to be used on the road
and NOT pavement?
yes it should NOT be allowed on the expressways either

before LTA start shouting down with all their excuses
if they had any to start with
here are the specifications:
its electricpowered
its under 49cc
its cannot exceed more than 50kmp
and its had been used in china and europes for over two decades or more
yes LTA might want to says
safety features
looked at the photo
it had FOUR wheels
can you skidd or goes offbalance?
and please
for Heaven's sake
don't even try
with COEs/ERPs shits as well
it just a bicycle that souped up liked a motorcycle
that looks real cool
by the way
for those who are keen
it would not cost you more than $700
as a matter of fact
lesser than that
so
LTA minister
what is your excuse?
any opinions
any ideas
on how to solve the transport woos
i have
which is why
i am called
mentorthegreat
it not just an ordinary nick
i am here to mentor you all
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« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2006, 10:27:30 PM »

11 August 2006

Special Advisory for passengers travelling to the UK and US

Passengers travelling to the UK and US, please read document attached for important travel advices before your departure.

Passengers with connecting flights within UK

Acting on instruction from the UK Government, advise passengers that no hand baggage can be carried on board any aircraft departing any UK airport. Passengers may take through the airport security search point, in a single (ideally transparent) plastic carrier bag, only the following items. Nothing may be carried in pockets:

  • pocket size wallets and pocket size purses plus contents (for example money, credit cards, identity cards etc (not handbags);
  • travel documents essential for the journey (for example passports and travel tickets);
  • prescription medicines and medical items sufficient and essential for the flight (e.g. diabetic kit), except in liquid form unless verified as authentic.
  • spectacles and sunglasses, without cases.
  • contact lens holders, without bottles of solution.
  • for those travelling with an infant: baby food, milk (the contents of each bottle must be tasted by the accompanying passenger) and sanitary items sufficient and essential for the flight (nappies, wipes, creams and nappy disposal bags).
  • female sanitary items sufficient and essential for the flight, if unboxed (e.g. tampons, pads, towels and wipes).
  • tissues (unboxed) and/or handkerchiefs
  • keys (but no electrical key fobs)


There are no changes to current hold baggage security measures.  Passengers are advised to check in as normal.



Passengers travelling to and from the US

As advised by the US Homeland Security, passengers may not have liquids or gels of any size at the screening checkpoint or in the cabin of the aircraft. This includes beverages, shampoo, suntan lotion, creams, toothpaste, hair gel, and other items of similar consistency. Such items may be transported in checked baggage.

Passengers may have - Baby formula, breast milk, or juice if a baby or small child is travelling. Prescription medicine with a name that matches the passenger's ticket. Insulin and essential other non-prescription medicines.



"As a precautionary measure, the MRT, buses and public transport system should NOT allow standing passengers." - Quoted by Fat Hope
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2006, 09:54:08 AM »

"As a precautionary measure, the MRT, buses and public transport system should NOT allow standing passengers." - Quoted by Fat Hope

Exactly. Fat hope.

To even expect them not to raise fares annually, when they are already profitable, is already so difficult. To make them suffer losses would be a real 'fat hope'.
Posted on: 11-08-2006, 23:12:16
What a can of worms. So how to tell if a teenager is a student or not? And how to be really sure he is getting concessions?


Quote
Tan Yen Ling:

There's a reason you pay reduced fares, students

I refer to the letter "Sow seats of respect" (Aug 15), in which Ms Daisy Tan wrote of her observation of a notice in a Gold Coast-Brisbane train that read: "Students on concessional cards must not occupy seats whilst adults are standing."

The issue is not so much about respect for adults but the value of a concession pass. The rationale is that full-fare paying passengers are entitled to a seat, more so than students on half-price (or a third of the price). As for offering seats to the elderly or the pregnant, it should be done out of goodwill by the more able-bodied
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #25 on: August 18, 2006, 04:44:14 AM »

It's not the first time this matter has been raised. And I have realised that, because I mostly end up standing on a trip home from Raffles Place to Boon Lay, it is better to stand than to sit because when you stand in the center of the car, the aircon is stronger than when you sit down. Above which, the aircon appears to be turned off intermittenly. In other words, you get a gush of it, perhaps when the train enters and / or leaves station and nothing in between.

Someone give the SMRT engineers a 'thumbs up' for coming with this ingenious idea to cut cost on energy.

Worse class transport, indeed.

Quote
Chua Kim Choo:

Stale air down there


Travelling on the MRT is not enjoyable in this hot season. I refer in particular to the older trains of the North-South line where the air-conditioning system seems ineffective and commuters have to suffer in silence. When I boarded the train to Raffles Place from Tanjong Pagar, not only did it feel airless, it also smelled stale.

It is time SMRT upgrades the air conditioning system in the trains before someone faints inside due to bad air circulation!
« Last Edit: August 18, 2006, 04:49:57 AM by Grievous » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2006, 01:23:14 AM »

When it's hot like the devil's bath at times, it's not commuter friendly.

And stop giving excuse to the stuffyness of your crappy trains by blaming the sun or 'exposure to external environmental factors' or 'too many people'.

It's not like only yesterday you f*ckwits knew that the weather here is hot and the sun is damned 'powderful'.  It's also not like yesterday you start having trains come at ridiculous intervals to more or less have every train running at 85% capacity.

Just admit you greedy asswipes have been cutting costs with this kind of air-conditioner settings and stop short changing us by doing something about those 'energy & cost saving' settings.


Quote
Upgraded trains to have more air-con vents and better air circulation

Letter from Dawn Low
Senior Manager, Corporate Marketing and Communications, SMRT Corporation Ltd


I refer to the letter, "Stale air down there" by Chua Kim Choo (Aug 18).

We would like to explain that there are two air-conditioners fitted with thermostats to regulate and control the temperature in each of the six cars in our trains. As the train moves along the viaducts and tunnels, air is also circulated in the train cars, which provides a cooling effect.

External factors such as direct sun radiation, passenger load and the inflow of warm air when the train doors open at stations can affect the temperature in the train car.

For example, during peak hours when passenger load is high, the trains may dwell longer at stations for passenger boarding and alighting, thereby causing an increase in the influx of hot air from external surroundings. Subsequently, more time is required for the temperature in the train cars to cool down to the desired level.

SMRT is committed to a stringent schedule of maintenance to ensure safety and normal functioning of our system, equipment and facilities. Notwithstanding this, we recognise that the MRT system is almost 20 years old, and wear and tear has inevitably set in.

Therefore, we have embarked on an initiative to upgrade our first-generation trains to ensure they remain safe, reliable and commuter-friendly. One of the improved features is the increase in air-conditioning vents and improved distribution so as to have better air circulation in the train.

We thank the writer for her feedback.
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« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2006, 10:24:48 AM »

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moshedyan
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« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2006, 11:19:16 PM »

to blowup one train is the easiest thinggie in this world
all we needs is just one jihad warrior
or a tamil tigress
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« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2006, 11:54:09 PM »

4th September 2006

IMF/World Bank delegates can enjoy VVIP treatment at newly opened luxury terminal

Some of the IMF/World Bank delegates arriving in Singapore will be among the first to get a taste of the new $10 million luxury terminal at Changi Airport.

Zero waiting time is what the Luxury Terminal JetQuay at Changi Airport claims to offer to departing passengers.

Their luggage and check-in will be handled by the service staff while the guests are whisked away to the lounge where they can enjoy fine dining, surf the Net, go for a run or catch a nap.

The luxury terminal also offers 4 private meeting rooms.

Membership will cost individuals an annual fee of $1,000 over and above a membership application fee of $1,000.

Other charges apply for corporations or small, medium enterprises.

More charges will apply when one utilises its services.

With an extra $1,000, members could get the VVIP treatment - that is to be ferried to your plane in the luxury of a limousine.

The limousine ride will cost non-members $2,000.

Another but less luxurious option is the JetQuay electric cart, which will ferry members to the departure gate at $250.

The price is $500 for non-members.

JetQuay is the first luxury terminal in Asia and its investors say that Germany is the only other place in the world that has such specialised luxury terminals.

JetQuay is a joint venture between local air cargo handler Worldwide Flight Services, VIP club operator Superior Travellers Services, and logistics company Sembawang Kimtrans.

Jeff Bent, Worldwide Flight Services' Director, said: "I think Singapore is a very good market to open a luxury terminal. It is a centre for private banking in Asia and there are a lot of high net worth individuals here. We expect to have over 50 customers per day by the end of the year, over 100 customers a day in the second and third years." - CNA/ir

Reference: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/228360/1/.html



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