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Author Topic: Give us a strong Mandate !!!  (Read 30440 times)
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« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2006, 09:31:56 AM »

12 September 2006

Public Transport Council approves 1.7% fare increase for bus, trains

SINGAPORE: From October, adult EZ-link fares for buses and trains will increase by 1 to 3 cents, which amounts to an overall fare hike of 1.7 percent.

Senior citizen off-peak EZ-link fares will correspondingly increase by 1 cent.

There are no increases in case fares for buses, single trip tickets for trains, child and student fares and monthly student and NS concession passes.

In August, public transport operators SMRT Corp and SBS Transit applied to the Public Transport Council for these increases.

The Council says that given the positive economic outlook, it assessed that there were no "extenuating circumstances" to vary or reject the proposal.

It has approved a "tiered increase," depending on the distance travelled so that those who make short trips or transfers will pay less.

The Council added that of all the bus and train trips, six in ten will see either no increase, or an increase of 1 cent.

This also works out to be a quarter of all commuters who will not see any increase at all.

The government has pledged to help needy families adjust to the increase.

In a news release, the government said it has lined up the schemes that are available, including the Citizens' Consultative Committees ComCare Fund.

This is part of the ComCare Fund launched last July to ensure that needy Singaporeans are not left behind.

Since then, $1.95m have been disbursed, which helped about 12,500 cases.

The two public transport operators have also contributed $1m for Public Transport Vouchers, which will also be available through the CCCs.

Each voucher is worth $20 and can be used to buy or top up EZ-link cards, or to buy monthly concession passes.

The National Trade Unions Congress (NTUC) has also come up with $1.6m in "NTUC Care and Share Vouchers" to help union members from low-income families to cope with increases in utilities and transport costs.

Community Development, Youth and Sports Minister Vivian Balakrishnan commended these organisations for stepping in to help needy families.

He said through the Comcare Fund, the government will also do its part. - CNA /dt

Reference: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/229899/1/.html



Once again .....
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« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2006, 08:51:38 PM »

28 September 2006

Electricity tariff to go up by 2.3% next quarter

SINGAPORE : Electricity tariffs will go up by an average of 2.3 percent or 0.49 cents per KWh (kilo-watt hour) between October 1 and December 31 this year.

SP Services explains that electricity price is pegged to the forward price of fuel, which is higher for the next quarter at $88.52 per barrel, compared to $87.49 per barrel previously.

Fuel cost makes up 55 percent of the cost of electricity.

The tariffs are reviewed every quarter and adjusted in line with fluctuation of fuel oil prices.

The tariff adjustments have been approved by industry regulator Energy Market Authority.

The next review will be in December. - CNA /ls

Reference: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/232855/1/.html




8th September 2006

Crude hits $66.25 a barrel, down 16% from July. Crude oil closed down $1.07 a barrel to $66.25 on Friday, a decline of 1.6%. Crude is off 16% from a closing peak of $79.92 on July 14. Gasoline futures are now down nearly 30% from a peak of $2.21 on Aug. 3, and consumers are seeing the benefits.
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« Reply #32 on: September 27, 2006, 09:19:54 PM »


8th September 2006

Crude hits $66.25 a barrel, down 16% from July. Crude oil closed down $1.07 a barrel to $66.25 on Friday, a decline of 1.6%. Crude is off 16% from a closing peak of $79.92 on July 14. Gasoline futures are now down nearly 30% from a peak of $2.21 on Aug. 3, and consumers are seeing the benefits.


I am shocked they don't have any strategic reserves and they never do hedging.

They probably ought to just fire their trader because his first name must have been Ryan.
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« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2006, 08:35:31 AM »

so this is the 1st avenue to fund the $4.5b .....

BLOODY PIRATES !!!!!11


8th September 2006

Crude hits $66.25 a barrel, down 16% from July. Crude oil closed down $1.07 a barrel to $66.25 on Friday, a decline of 1.6%. Crude is off 16% from a closing peak of $79.92 on July 14. Gasoline futures are now down nearly 30% from a peak of $2.21 on Aug. 3, and consumers are seeing the benefits.


I am shocked they don't have any strategic reserves and they never do hedging.

They probably ought to just fire their trader because his first name must have been Ryan.
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« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2006, 10:45:09 PM »

6 October 2006

Power bills to fall 2% in next four months (Bangkok)

Electricity prices will fall by more than 2% for the next four months after the fuel adjustment cost, known as the Ft charge, dropped for the first time in four years thanks to new supply from a coal power plant, energy regulators said yesterday.

The new Ft rate for October to January will be 78.42 satang per unit (kilowatt/hour), a decline of 8.2% from 85.44 satang in the previous four-month period, said Yongyuth Vichaidit, the chairman of the Electricity Regulatory Board.

When the Ft charge is added to the base electricity price of 2.26 baht per unit, the electricity cost for the current period is 3.04 baht per unit _ a decrease of 2.2% from 3.11 baht for the previous four-month period.

The lower costs reflect increased production of 2.616 billion units from the coal-fired BLCP power plant in Rayong. That electricity had been produced using more expensive fuel oil, which cost around six billion baht, said Mr Yongyuth.

The increased use of hydropower to generate electricity supported the decrease of the Ft charge as well, he added.

Nonetheless, the cost of electricity bought from neighbouring countries is rising in line with global natural gas and diesel prices, preventing the Ft charge from dropping more than 7.02 satang per unit, Mr Yongyuth said.

The price decrease prompted the interim energy regulator to cancel subsidies for household consumers whose utilisation volume does not exceed 150 units per month. It also scrapped a subsidy of 10 satang per unit given to farmers who used electricity for water pumping, he said.

''The government would not compensate us, so we have to stop subsidisation,'' said Mr Yongyuth.

Although customers will enjoy cheaper prices until January, the Ft charge for February to May 2007 is expected to increase around eight satang per unit due to growing demand for electricity in the summertime and the ongoing surge in global fuel prices, said Mr Yongyuth.

''Electricity generation costs will go up in the summer because fuel oil will be used for additional production volume,'' he said.

Reference: http://www.bangkokpost.com/Business/06Oct2006_biz37.php



Are we being ripped off or what? Or are we paying for their mistakes?
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« Reply #35 on: October 06, 2006, 03:05:51 AM »

Power bills to fall 2% in next four months (Bangkok)

For a moment so happy.

Then I saw the word:

BANGKOK

No wonder the Thai Army is still popular in spite of the coup.
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« Reply #36 on: November 13, 2006, 07:47:05 AM »

" to strengthen the safety nets and tilt the balance in favour of the lower-income groups who do not benefit from the fruits of economic growth. "

WHAT safety nets? Those allegedly available ones where a camel would sooner enter a pinhole before you would qualify for a cent of it?

66.6%!! Thank you very much!!!


Quote
GST to be raised to 7%: Baby Lee
 By Lee Foong Ming, Channel NewsAsia  
 Posted: 13 November 2006 1832 hrs

     
SINGAPORE: The Goods and Services Tax will be increased to 7 percent, up from 5 percent presently.

This was announced by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in Parliament on Monday but when exactly will be decided later.

Speaking in Malay, Mandarin and English, Mr Lee explained that the hike is necessary to finance the enhanced social safety nets, needed to help the lower income group, and he emphasised that the offset package will more than counter the rise in GST.

While Singapore's current model to tackle the widening income gap is sound, Mr Lee said the government will take on 2 approaches to deal with the new environment - to strengthen the safety nets and tilt the balance in favour of the lower-income groups who do not benefit from the fruits of economic growth.

To do this, government spending will have to go up. The government now spends some 15 percent of its GDP - one of the lowest in the world.

"This is inevitable over the next 5 to 10 years - infrastructure investments will cost money - R&D is to cost $5b over the next 5 years; as medical technology improves, people age and more will go to hospital to get more treatment so spending is bound to go up. As we tilt the playing field across the board, the lower income will be getting another boost not just once in awhile. Therefore its better to start building resources now so that when we spend more," said Mr Lee.

To finance this, indirect taxes or the Goods & Services Tax will have to go up.

"It will give us precious extra resources to implement social programmes like Workfare later on. Our aim is to help the lower income groups and the elderly, not to increase their burdens. When we implement the GST increase, it's not just the GST increase, it's the package which will fully offset the impact of the GST increase and begin to strengthen the social safety nets and tilt the balance in favour of the low income groups - we will not just raise the GST but we will have a comprehensive offset package," said Mr Lee.

This package will be weighted more to the middle and the low income groups, especially the elderly, and it will more than offset the GST increase.

"It is not just an offset package to deal with the GST. It is a whole set of measures which we are taking in order to tilt the playing field in favour of the lower income group, which is what we have to add and tally in the balance, and my purpose is to help the lower income group. For the middle income, it will be generally about ok; for the higher income, I think the higher income should end up paying more overall. It's part of being one society. I'm not going to tax 15% on income tax, I'm not going to tax 25% from GST the way the Scandanavians do, but I have to make the adjustments of 2% which I think is fair and I think Singaporeans will support," said Mr Lee.

Mr Lee explained that it is better to do the increase now when the economy is doing well, rather than wait till later.

This will give the government time to see how this adjustment can be managed, and to cope better with the unknown forces of globalisation over the next 5 to 7 years.

More details of the GST increase will be announced on 15 February 2007, which is Budget Day.

Another change will be the amending of the Constitution to allow the government to tap the capital gains received from investing the national reserves. - CNA /dt





Quote
GST to go up to 7%, pledge to tilt help in favour of lower-income, elderly
 By Bernice Bong, Straits Times Interactive
      
SINGAPORE'S Goods and Services Tax or GST will go up to 7 per cent from the current 5 per cent to fund bigger government spending as Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong pledged that the Government will work to tilt the balance of help in favour of the lower-income.

Mr Lee was speaking in Parliament on Monday when the House resumed debate over President S R Nathan's address at its opening last week.

'Our aim is to help lower income group and the elderly, not to increase their burden,' he said.

Comprehensive package
'When we implement the GST increase, it's not just a GST increase, it's a package which will fully offset the impact of GST for this group and begin to strengthen the social safety net and tilt the balance in favour of the lower income Singaporeans,' said Mr Lee.

He said the government knew how to implement a comprehensive offset package because it had done this twice in the past.

'In 1994 when we introduced the GST and then in 2003 when we raised the GST and we had the economic restructuring shares package. We made sure that a large segment of Singaporeans ended up not worse off,' he said.

Mr Lee said for the next round of hike, the package will weigh 'more heavily towards the middle and especially the lower income group and the elderly poor'.

Flexibility
He said he prefered to hike the GST now when the economy is doing well because the Government will 'have the flexibility to adjust our programme depending on how things turned out'.

He stressed it was better to get 'ready, ammunition prepared and powder dry'.

Mr Lee said the Government was working out the details and will announce the GST increase in Budget 2007.

He added Second Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam will deliver the Budget speech on Feb 15 2007.
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« Reply #37 on: December 26, 2006, 08:15:42 PM »

27 December 2006

Nearly 8% reduction in electricity tariff for first quarter of 2007

SINGAPORE : Households and businesses in Singapore will enjoy cheaper electricity tariffs for the period January 1 to March 31 next year.

Singapore Power says tariffs will be reduced by an average of 7.53 percent or 1.62 cents per kilowatt hour during the three months.

The reduction is due to lower electricity costs resulting from lower fuel prices.

Singapore Power says electricity tariffs are reviewed quarterly, and reset, if necessary. - CNA /ls

Reference: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/249185/1/.html

27 December 2006
Crude oil for February delivery was at $61.14 a barrel, up 0.1 percent, in after-hours electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange at 9:29 a.m. in Singapore. The contract earlier fell as much as 34 cents, or 0.6 percent, to $60.76 a barrel.

8% ....  feels like a donkey?



28 September 2006

Electricity tariff to go up by 2.3% next quarter

SINGAPORE : Electricity tariffs will go up by an average of 2.3 percent or 0.49 cents per KWh (kilo-watt hour) between October 1 and December 31 this year.

SP Services explains that electricity price is pegged to the forward price of fuel, which is higher for the next quarter at $88.52 per barrel, compared to $87.49 per barrel previously.

Fuel cost makes up 55 percent of the cost of electricity.

The tariffs are reviewed every quarter and adjusted in line with fluctuation of fuel oil prices.

The tariff adjustments have been approved by industry regulator Energy Market Authority.

The next review will be in December. - CNA /ls

Reference: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/232855/1/.html





8th September 2006

Crude hits $66.25 a barrel, down 16% from July. Crude oil closed down $1.07 a barrel to $66.25 on Friday, a decline of 1.6%. Crude is off 16% from a closing peak of $79.92 on July 14. Gasoline futures are now down nearly 30% from a peak of $2.21 on Aug. 3, and consumers are seeing the benefits.

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« Reply #38 on: March 27, 2007, 07:22:53 PM »

Give them a 'strong mandate' lah!!... 66.6%.  抵死!!

Quote
NZ govt took heed of public views in setting pay
March 28, 2007
   
I AM rather disappointed with the Government's insensitivity in raising the issue of ministerial pay at a time when many ordinary Singaporeans are still trying to cope with rising living costs.

In 1994 when the then Prime Minister urged Parliament to approve the formula for setting ministers' pay, he suggested that paying $22 million a year for his team was a small price, compared to the cost of having an incompetent and corrupt government.

However, according to the TI 2006 Corruption Perceptions Index, there are four other countries which are less corrupt than Singapore. New Zealand is placed No. 1 (together with Finland and Iceland) whereas Singapore is ranked No. 5. Does this mean that the salaries of NZ ministers should be many times higher than those of Singapore ministers?

This doesn't seem to be the case. In a 2003 article by the NZ Herald, it was pointed out that even though the Prime Minister had the 'toughest job in the country' and an equivalent private-sector position would command a seven-figure salary, this would not be acceptable to taxpayers. Her increased salary of NZ$305,000 was deemed reasonable as US President George W. Bush earned only about NZ$330,470 a year.

In setting the remuneration packages of its ministers, the New Zealand government was sensitive to the perceptions of the public (whom it described as 'paying customers') and benchmarked figures against those of its Western counterparts.

As Singapore is an Asian country, should we not be benchmarking our figures against our Asian counterparts'? Even if we consider ourselves as a Western country, our ministers are already being paid many times more than President Bush himself.

So far, the impression we have been given is that serving our country is like any other financial transaction or commercial project; money is the primary focus and motivation. There is no altruism or patriotism linked to the discussion.

I hope that Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and his Government can take a different approach to this issue.


Vanessa Teo Toon Lin (Ms)
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« Reply #39 on: March 28, 2007, 09:20:28 AM »

ok ... lets play role play ...

Minister Pay Feedback Processing Unit front end processor, 64x quad core 64bit CPU with 1TB ram says :

"Good day.

Please be informed that you call will be recorded for training purposes.

Your disappointment have been noted.

Thank you for your feedback as it will help us to serve you better.

Good bye.

Beeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee"


Quote



   
I AM rather disappointed with the Government's insensitivity in raising the issue of ministerial pay at a time when many ordinary Singaporeans are still trying to cope with  bla bla bla .....
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« Reply #40 on: April 20, 2007, 12:55:55 AM »

Budget Speech
By NCMP Sylvia Lim


Sir, the Second Finance Minister has outlined increased social spending in the years ahead. This is to be expected of any government faced with an aging population, an increasing income gap and the threat of an underclass developing if the income gap is unchecked. Looking at the Budget offerings, I support the principle behind supplementing low wages and keeping our low wage workers employed.

In an earlier television forum (30 Nov 2006), the Second Finance Minister had said that the increased social spending over the next 5 years would be between $2b to $4b more each year. Indeed, this has been borne out by the figures in this year's budget estimates. The Total Expenditure for FY 2007 amounts to an increase of about $2.4b over the previous year.

Sir, as articulated in the speech by the Member for Hougang yesterday, we in the Workers' Party are not convinced that there is a need to raise Goods and Services Tax by 2% this year. Whether there is a need to raise it at all in the future would depend on the financial information and projections available to us at that time, including the impact of such an increase on our citizens.

Sir, the Budget statement suggests that we will be losing some revenue from the proposed tax restructuring. Key items mentioned were the reduction in the corporate tax rate and some indirect taxes. But the key question is: assuming we do not raise GST, what is the likely net position? Will we still have enough revenues to fund the additional social spending of $2b to $4b per year?

Land sales revenue
The first question we want to ask is why land sales revenue is excluded from the budget.

According to Budget papers, the revenue from land sales is about $4b to $5b per year. This figure by itself is more than sufficient to pay for the increased social spending of $2b to $4b per year.

Economists have noted that excluding land sales from the Budget is overly conservative and not in line with international standards. The argument is that such revenue is recurrent income rather than capital in nature. The government usually leases out land and revenues accrue at regular intervals.

Among those who have criticized our conservative accounting is the International Monetary Fund (ST 15/2/07). They have said that 'The Government's definition of Budget balance underestimates the strength of Singapore's fiscal position as operating revenue excludes a substantial portion of investment income and earnings from land leases,' (2005). Last year, they advised that: 'The authorities should take steps to compile and publish the consolidated public sector accounts in line with international accounting standards.'

Sir, perhaps the government is excluding land sales from the Budget because it fears volatility due to market conditions and we cannot assume the incomes will always be there. Prime Minister had previously used the term "lumpy" to describe such revenues. This is a reasonable concern. However, even if we do not take the entire $4 or $5b income from land sales, surely we can budget based on a portion of the average revenues over the last few years? i.e. Instead of budgeting based on $4b, we could budget based on say half e.g. $2b? Surely the volatility cannot be so severe that we will have a year where land sales generate no revenue at all.

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) reported in May 2006 that the Budget principles adopted by the Singapore government tend to under-report its true fiscal strength. Perhaps it is time to adopt the international benchmarks to reflect the true position.

Net Investment Income contribution
One missing piece of the GST debate puzzle is the impending change to the definition of Net Investment Income.

We have been told that the Constitution would be amended to include realized capital gains as part of NII, which up to now was only restricted to interest and dividends. How much additional revenue will be available after the change? In response to our question in Parliament in January, Second Finance Minister said that the government was still working out the formula with the President and the details would only be available in the coming months. He mentioned that they were working on minimizing the volatility of the flows.

However, Prime Minister told Parliament in November that "a significant part of the returns (on reserves) are capital gains" (Hansard, Nov 13). He noted that on the average, we should expect a buffer from the new NII definition. Based on the size of the government
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« Reply #41 on: July 19, 2007, 07:07:29 PM »

13 November 2006

GST to be raised to 7%: PM Lee

SINGAPORE: The Goods and Services Tax will be increased to 7 percent from 5 percent presently.


This was announced by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in Parliament on Monday.

However, when the rise will be implemented, will be decided later.

Speaking in Malay, Mandarin and English, Mr Lee explained that the hike was necessary to finance the enhanced social safety nets, needed to help the lower income group and he emphasised that the offset package would more than counter the rise in GST.

While Singapore's current model to tackle the widening income gap is sound, Mr Lee said the government would take on two approaches to deal with the new environment - to strengthen the safety nets and tilt the balance in favour of the lower-income groups who do not benefit from the fruits of economic growth.

To do this, government spending will have to go up. The government now spends some 15 percent of its GDP - one of the lowest in the world.

"This is inevitable over the next 5 to 10 years. Infrastructure investments will cost money - R&D is to cost $5b over the next 5 years; as medical technology improves, people age and more will go to hospitals to get more treatment, so spending is bound to go up. As we tilt the playing field across the board, the lower income will be getting another boost, not just once in a while. Therefore its better to start building resources now so that when we spend more, we have the means to do so," said Mr Lee.

To finance this, indirect taxes or the Goods & Services Tax will have to go up.

"It will give us precious extra resources to implement social programmes like Workfare later on. Our aim is to help the lower income groups and the elderly, not to increase their burdens. When we implement the GST increase, it's not just the GST increase, it's the package which will fully offset the impact of the GST increase and begin to strengthen the social safety nets and tilt the balance in favour of the low income groups - we will not just raise the GST but we will have a comprehensive offset package," said Mr Lee.

This package will be weighted more to the middle and the low income groups, especially the elderly, and it will more than offset the GST increase.

"It is not just an offset package to deal with the GST. It is a whole set of measures which we are taking in order to tilt the playing field in favour of the lower income group, which is what we have to add and tally in the balance, and my purpose is to help the lower income group. For the middle income, it will be generally about ok; for the higher income, I think the higher income should end up paying more overall. It's part of being one society. I'm not going to tax 15% on income tax, I'm not going to tax 25% from GST the way the Scandanavians do, but I have to make the adjustments of 2% which I think is fair and I think Singaporeans will support," added Mr Lee.

He explained that it is better to do the increase now when the economy is doing well, rather than wait till later. This will give the government time to see how this adjustment can be managed, and to cope better with the unknown forces of globalisation over the next 5 to 7 years.

More details of the GST increase will be announced on 15 February 2007, which is Budget Day. Mr Lee added that Second Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam would deliver the Budget speech.

Another change will be the amending of the Constitution to allow the government to tap the capital gains received from investing the national reserves. - CNA /dt

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/241058/1/.html


Late Post ... Better than NO Post ...
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« Reply #42 on: July 29, 2007, 06:18:40 AM »

样样起,起到我,脸青青...

You say lah.. still got mood to put flag?  LOL


Quote
Singaporeans hardly display flags nowadays
July 21, 2007

I APPLAUD the Government in relaxing the restrictions on the use of the national flag.

I was driving along the expressway the other day when I saw a block of flats had already been decorated with the national flag.

The sight reminded me that National Day is only three weeks away, yet I have completely forgotten to display mine.

Nowadays we are too preoccupied with making more money in the raging stock market or sizzling property market. Or thinking how we can land the next higher paying job.

Moreover, the Government talks about more private homes being built, F1 coming to town and the two IRs ready in two to three years' time. Hardly anyone says it's that time of the year Singaporeans should bring out their flags and display them.

I remembered there was a campaign many years back where Singaporeans were strongly urged to display the national flag and the RCs would visit every household to sell flags to the residents. That year, I felt an immense sense of pride when I saw almost every household in each block immersed in a sea of red with the national flag being hung.

Sadly, in particular for the last few years, I no longer see this phenomenon. It seems that Singaporeans are less bothered to display the national flag when the economy is doing well. Singaporeans should be mindful of that 'fateful' day, Aug 9, 1965, which laid the foundation for Singapore to be what she is today through the hard work of our forefathers and the Government.

Let's fly our national flag high to show our love for Singapore even though we may not have the opportunity to attend the National Day Parade nor the time to watch it on TV because we are busy monitoring the stock market or working out the sums to invest in the next property.


Chan Hean Boon
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« Reply #43 on: January 07, 2008, 07:14:27 AM »

Taken from Diary of A Singaporean Mind

2007 : A year of great PAP achievements!!!

Sunday, December 23, 2007

Even for the 66.6% who voted for new gardens and fountains around their estate, what the PAP managed to achieve this year is simply unparalleled. I can't think of another year when so much was accomplished in so short a time. US$10B for UBS, US$5B for Merrill...no other govt has been able to toss a few billions into troubled foreign banks while asking its old, sick and disabled to live on 2 meals a day under its Public Assistance Scheme. That was a final act to top of a year of grand achievements.... even by PAP standards, it has been a great year:

1. Finally justice for our suffering elites. The minister pay hike must be the single biggest achievement of the year. It has been too unfair too ridiculous for our ministers to have to make such a painful sacrifice for so long. Since there is no minimum wages for low income workers why should there be a maximum wage of our top elites, the ministers.

2. GST hike to 7%. GST hike is to help the poor. The poor who pay no income taxes feel left out -unable to contribute to the govt coffers so that it can do great things like buying stakes in UBS & Merrill Lynch. The GST hike is to help the poor contribute more to the govt so they don't have feel left out of their grand achievements.

3. Price hikes on everything. Yes, the govt was very concern that the slight pay increment you got at the beginning of 2007 might undermine your work ethics and they know you were very troubled by that extra money which you don't know what to do with. You don't have to worry any more - through a series of price hikes, that extra money has disappeared. In fact, the inflation rate which is at a 16 yr high probably ate up more than your increment. Now you have to work harder to make up for the inflation. You should be happy you haven't lost your work ethics this year.

4. People & more people. This is the year of population expansion. Singaporeans refuse to have more babies as cost of living rises but that is no problem for the PAP govt. They can always import. ...and import they did. Our population has been pushed to 4.68M. I guess they PAP has more than enough capacity to serve Singaporeans. Although our hospitals, roads, housing and buses have become more crowded, it is a simple matter of raising prices to bring down the demand. That is why ERP, bus fares and taxi fares have to be increased to reduce the congestion and overcrowding. As I understand it, PAP govt feels that it still has alot more capacity left to serve so more people will be brought in.

5. Annuities. Yes I know many of you are eagerly waiting for details of the scheme. I have no doubt the PAP govt will implement it. Singaporeans living beyond 80 yrs will be an unacceptable economic burden for the PAP govt in the coming years. While it has money to risk in troubled foreign banks, giving govt aid to 80 yr olds to keep them alive is an unthinkable idea. Singaporeans have to learn to pay for the trouble they cause by living too long - it is too much for them to expect the PAP govt to do something for them when they are too old to even walk. The PAP has figured out better use for its money like putting them in troubled American banks and telcos in neighboring countries.

2007 shows the PAP at its best. Singaporeans are lucky to have such a capable govt and can look forward to many more good years ahead....
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dapengmingwang
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« Reply #44 on: January 15, 2008, 03:20:49 AM »

The Gah-Men Thinks We Are Stupid

You know what, I just about had it. Drill a hole in my wallet, and fuck around with my life. Play God if it's all I care.

But don't insult my intelligence while you're at it.

I can stand it if our taxes are raised, even though we are running on a tax 20% surplus nearly every single year since independance. I can even accept that the powers that be change rules on a whim and leaches you for every single cent you have for their own coffers.

But for FUCK's sake, don't pretend that "it's for my own good!"

Proof you say? Sure. Let me give you proof.

1. Zoning laws are changed every election for efficiency's sake. Strangely enough, every GRC that is opposition-controlled, or declined in support of the ruling party, has its area reduced, split up or amalgated into those with strong support. Marine Parade Town Council now manages Serangoon Garden. The nearest body of water is that which is in the fish tank at home.

2. Sengkang is an integrated new town. The LRT stations run AROUND the estate. Most of the people stay in the MIDDLE of the estate.

3. The NEL is a frigging automated system, one can reduce manpower costs and make the trains run more efficiently, and hence the trips are cheaper. The project was finished S$5 BILLION under budget, almost a year late, and every train has 1 or 2 men in green. A precaution in case the trains break down. Brilliant.

4. ERP is suppose to reduce road tax and make car ownership more accessible. For all the bloody gantries that came up, road tax was reduced by an insignificant amount,for a stupid amount of extra charges through ERP. Inefficiency? or sheer ass stupidity.

5. Long time ago, we were told that using the EZlink system, everyone pays the correct fares, and thus can help reduce the overall cost of buses and public transport. In fact, there was one time bus fares was raised for the reason that dishonest commuters are costing millions of dollars to bus companies. Bus fares have NEVER decreased for a period of 25 years.

6. SMRT raised prices of train fares shortly after SARS ended, quoting the reason that they are making losses and are unable to sustain operations at current levels. 3 cents increase conservatively equals to a S$200,000 increase in revenue per DAY AT NO INCREASE IN COST. After intense rebuttal, they published a statement in the papers, citing the writing off of 17 new trains to the tune of $237 MILLION dollars as expense, as a reason for increasing fares. If any private company did this, ACRA would be down their necks faster that the alien in AVP.

7. ERP gantries are popping up everywhere and it's not due to the monsoon season. The reason is to regulate traffic flow and prevent congestion. I urge the Minister of Transport to drive from Yishun to his office in town for a month. After that, tell me how ERP has improved traffic flow in the peak hours.

8. CPF is suppose to be for our old age. It's suppose to be our money. I dare anyone to try going to a bank and borrowing money, using our CPF as collateral.

This are just SOME examples that show that either a) the powers that be don't have a high regard for our own people's intelligence, or b) they are overpaying their PR and corporate comms team.

So yeah, go ahead and do what you want with the country. Just don't try to convince me it's for my own good, and that if I leave this country, I'm a quitter.
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